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continuous improvement

Steve Jobs on Innovation

in Agile/Agile Engineering by

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Sometimes when you innovate, you make mistakes. It is best to admit them quick, and get on with improving your other innovations.Steve Jobs

Five Simple Guidelines to Agile Metric Bliss

in Agile/Agile Engineering/Project Management by

Over the past couple years, I’ve had the opportunity to work with many great teams in many industries. I often work with teams and their managers to generate reports. In doing so, I quickly realize that although teams may be working to adapt and leverage one of the frameworks that fall under the Agile moniker, they are not yet adopting or clearly understanding the Agile Principles and Values. This comes through clearly when we look at the kinds of reports people are using.

kittenI’ve seen dashboards that compare multiple team’s velocity. Or, the classic utilization report that shows time worked by team member. Or, the quality reporting that focuses on who versus what. And then there is the singular snapshot that represents percentage of backlog done – doesn’t sound that bad until you have a manager have kittens because the percentage is not what as expected.

Now, I have to admit — I’ve made all these reports before and used them myself. Sometimes the purpose of the report had an intended outcome, but my best intentions sometimes resulted in gamesmanship of the numbers or fear by the team and in one case, a team member pulled me aside worried that he may be culled.

Let’s face it, all metrics and reports can be used for bad. But what do you need to do to create good metrics? There are some great resources all over the internet that help answer this question, but let me give you my top five things you can do to make your metrics effective while fostering an agile environment:

  1. Make them Transparent. This is obvious, but often I see people create reports and don’t share them. I get that there are some reports for “their eyes only”; however, in most cases, if not all, unless it has salary information — make the reports visible to everyone – the Team, Stakeholders, Managers, and even Customers.
  2. Make them Visual. Use charts, shapes, colors, and or pictures over a table of figures. We do this for three reasons – easy to read, reduces the likelihood that people focus solely on outlier values, and in many cases — creates conversations. By the way, use colors wisely — just like words, colors mean stuff.
  3. Follow the Trends. Goes hand-in-hand with visualize — a good metric should be informative provided indicators that make it easy to see if the needle is pointing up or pointing down. Trends generally allow you to decide if what we are doing is good or bad, and reduce snap decisions.
  4. Make them Relevant and Timely. There are the out-of-the-box metrics — burn downs, cumulative flow, burn ups, cycle time, and or velocity – that should be maintained on a daily, weekly, or iteration basis — updating them in arrears does no good. This is the same for all agile metrics. Since the goal of any metric should be to continuously improve in some way, reports/metrics that are created or updated weeks or months after the fact does us no good. And, couldn’t we better utilize the time and brain power on something current.
  5. Have a Purpose. Every report or metric needs to be leveraged for importance. If you cannot answer two questions about a report or metric, maybe you should stop spending time and money to create the report. First, why are we creating this report? And, second, what will we do if the report is indicating a need to adjust or change?

Now, these are my five simple (and in some cases, general) guidelines – what are your’s? Do you have any suggestions?

Always keep in mind …

Working software is the primary measure of progress.

Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.

At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.Agile Manifesto

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